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Press Releases | The Atlantic
Press Releases | The Atlantic
Floodlines: The story of an unnatural disaster
“We know why the levees broke. We already built levees that won’t break the same way again,” narrates the Atlantic staff writer Vann R. Newkirk II in Floodlines. “But as for the people—those who couldn’t come back—the neighborhoods and communities that just stand as memorials now while others thrive, there are lots of things that no levees could fix. Some things that were maybe even deeper than earth and water.”It’s this story, of what lies deeper than earth and water—of a disaster waiting just below the surface, seeped into the legacy of America—that forms Floodlines, a gripping eight-part podcast from The Atlantic examining what happened in New Orleans after the levees broke. Reported and hosted by Vann R. Newkirk II, executive produced by Katherine Wells, and produced by Alvin Melathe and Kevin Townsend, Floodlines revisits the story of Hurricane Katrina through the experiences of four New Orleanians—Le-Ann Williams, Fred Johnson, Alice Craft-Kerney, and Sandy Rosenthal—who remained in the city through the storm and its aftermath, and who are still living with the consequences.All eight parts of Floodlines, spanning nearly four and a half hours, are available to listen to in full today on any podcast app (Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Google Play) and at theatlantic.com/floodlines. Woven throughout is the music of the New Orleans composer Christian Scott, which forms a hauntingly beautiful soundtrack.Floodlines shows that the catastrophic outcome of the levee breaches in New Orleans was the result not of a natural disaster, but of an unnatural one: the failure of government, media, and society, leading to one of the most misunderstood events in modern-day America. In taking listeners through the experiences of Le-Ann Williams, Fred Johnson, Alice Craft-Kerney, and Sandy Rosenthal, and in hearing the conspiracies and rumors that fueled media reports and clouded the official response, Newkirk shows that the government failed at its most basic job. Craft-Kerney describes it to Newkirk this way: “As a person of color, you always have it in the back of your mind that the government really doesn't care about you. Katrina validated that. It cemented it.”Floodlines also questions and occasionally unearths new regrets from the officials responsible for the country’s response: Michael Brown, the former FEMA director; Lieutenant General Russel Honore, lauded as a “black John Wayne” for coordinating the evacuation of the Superdome and the convention center; and the former New Orleans police chief Eddie Compass. Brown’s interview with Newkirk lasted six hours; at one point, he wrestled with whether to apologize, and for what.In one exchange, Newkirk asked Brown about the lack of response and acknowledgement that thousands of people were stranded at the convention center. How could his agency have missed this? Brown replied: “We didn’t. We knew they were there. I knew immediately. I knew immediately.” Newkirk pressed: “Is it unreasonable for somebody to come and say, ‘We see you’re here’? Or ‘We’re gonna come get you’? You can walk from the Superdome to the convention center. Nobody walked or tried to make it in the 36 hours?”Brown responded: “I think the acknowledgment piece—I think you’re right. I think you’re right on that one. I think you’re absolutely right … There is no explanation for it other than, I think, by that point the system was overwhelmed … I just think we have this unrealistic expectation that this massive federal bureaucracy can just instantaneously do stuff. And it just cannot.”For 163 years, The Atlantic has been home to long-form storytelling; Floodlines builds on this tradition and represents The Atlantic’s first foray into long-form audio. Editor in Chief Jeffrey Goldberg explains that returning to the story of the day the levees broke “provided a way to explain issues of race and class, and truth and lies. We knew it was a way to explore our relationship with nature itself. But we did not know then how chillingly relevant it would be. Katrina marked a breakpoint in the history of our country, a moment when Americans came to understand that, sometimes, the cavalry isn't coming.”###Press Contacts:Anna Bross + Helen Tobin // The Atlanticpress@theatlantic.com
2020-03-12 12:00:00
2021-05-12T08:53:10.000000
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theatlantic.com
“How to Destroy a Government”—In The Atlantic’s April issue, George Packer reveals how President Trump is winning his war on American institutions, and argues that a second term will irrevocably harm what remains.
When Donald Trump took office, there was a sense among career bureaucrats that the new president would be outmatched by the vast United States government. Seasoned officials would serve as “the adults” in the room, deflecting the new president’s worst ideas, waiting out his impulses, and protecting the State and Justice Departments from lasting harm. They were smarter than Trump was, and they would outlast him. Three years later, those “adults” are gone, and, as one former high-ranking government lawyer says, those who still think they can contain the president are “fooling themselves”—Trump is “light-years ahead of them.” “How to Destroy a Government,” The Atlantic’s April cover story, by staff writer George Packer, reveals in stark detail how President Trump is winning his war on American institutions. By punishing perceived enemies, driving out competent career bureaucrats, and disregarding democratic norms, Trump has bent the executive branch to his own self-interest. Packer writes that Trump’s actions have revealed “how many things that had always seemed engraved in monumental stone turned out to depend on those flimsy norms.” Through dozens of interviews with current and former officials at the FBI, the State Department, and the Department of Justice, Packer exposes the current precariousness of these establishments, where morale is low, public servants worry about having their lives and reputations destroyed through a presidential tweet, and mid-career professionals are debating how much longer they can continue to serve their country. Government officials take an oath to protect the Constitution, but from the moment Trump entered the White House, he made it clear that loyalty to him was paramount. Packer tells the story of former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe, who describes how Trump turned to Twitter to attack him and assault his professional integrity after he became involved in the Russia investigation. McCabe tells Packer that in addition to the public insults, Trump simultaneously tried to humiliate him privately—insulting McCabe’s wife, trying to drive a wedge between him and his colleagues, and working to extract pledges of fealty.Trump eventually induced the firing of McCabe when he was just 26 hours short of retirement, part of his effort to force out every member of the FBI leadership who’d investigated him. As Andrew McCabe’s wife, Jill, explains: “There’s a lot of people out there who are unwilling to stand up and do the right thing, because they don’t want to be the next Andrew McCabe.” By making an example of the McCabes, Trump created a culture of fear that reverberated through the Department of Justice. Erica Newland, a DOJ attorney who resigned in 2018, described the fearful silence that replaced open discussion. Career officials, Packer writes, “saw what was happening to colleagues in the FBI who had crossed the president during the investigation into Russian election interference—careers and reputations in ruins.” She and her colleagues used their skills to justify presidential orders of sometimes dubious legality. “There was hardly any respect for the other departments of government—not for the lower courts, not for Congress … for facts or the truth,” Newland told Packer. “Corruption is the right word for this.” Things got so bad in the Office of the Legal Counsel, Newland tells Packer, that she began analogizing herself and her colleagues to Nazi bureaucrats in the 1930s—how far would their complicity go before they stopped rationalizing it?Since his appointment as attorney general, William Barr has abetted the president’s efforts to silence dissenters and expand the powers of the presidency. As Packer writes: “Barr and Trump are pursuing very different projects—the one a crusade to align the government with his idea of religious authority, the other a venal quest for self-aggrandizement. But they serve each other’s purpose by collaborating to destroy the independence of anything—federal agencies, the public servants who work in them, even the other branches of government—that could restrain the president.”The cost of Trump’s war on the civil service has been both human and institutional. Take Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch. As false reports about her spread in the right-wing media, and through the president’s Twitter account, in March 2019, Yovanovitch asked for a statement from Secretary of State Mike Pompeo that she had his full confidence. Pompeo declined, Packer reports, and said that no statement would be made on her behalf until those attacking her—Rudy Giuliani, Sean Hannity, and others—were asked for their evidence. Senior career officials also declined to support Yovanovitch, a sign that professional morale and independence were being destroyed by relentless politicization. Packer writes: “The Ukraine story, like the Russia story before it, did not represent a morality tale in which truth and honor stood up to calumny and corruption and prevailed. Yovanovitch is gone, and so is her replacement, William Taylor Jr. … while Pompeo is still there and above him, so is the president. Trump is winning.”Read “How to Destroy a Government” at The Atlantic. The April issue of the magazine appears on newsstands on March 17, and pieces will continue to publish at The Atlantic across the coming weeks.Press Contacts:Anna Bross + Helen Tobin // The Atlanticpress@theatlantic.com
2020-03-02 12:00:00
2021-05-12T08:53:10.000000
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theatlantic.com
“The Nuclear Family Was a Mistake” — In The Atlantic’s March issue, David Brooks considers a better way to live together
For The Atlantic’s March cover, David Brooks makes a powerful and provocative argument that “The Nuclear Family Was a Mistake.” His story is an examination of the shift over the past century from a familial structure that prized interconnected extended families, with grandparents upstairs and aunts across the street, to one that idealizes detached nuclear families—and how this structure has been a catastrophe for many, namely children and lower-income Americans.Brooks writes in the cover story, published today at The Atlantic, that despite its glorification, the two-parent, 2.5-kid household is a remarkably fragile arrangement for buffering against the challenges of life. Parents are ill-equipped for the demands of raising kids without extended family nearby, and many lack the strong economic and emotional support system necessary for managing life’s challenges. The wealthy are able to maximize their options by effectively buying extended family in the form of tutors, therapists, coaches, and nannies; their money also buffers them in an emergency. But in the nuclear-family dynamic, the less wealthy and more vulnerable have suffered, struggling to recover from a health issue, divorce, or job loss without a large family network. Brooks writes: “A detached nuclear family is an intense set of relationships among, say, four people. If one relationship breaks, there are no shock absorbers. In a nuclear family, the end of the marriage means the end of the family as it was previously understood.”As more and more Americans face this reality, Brooks argues for the return of the extended family, and reports on signs that it may naturally be reemerging. He reports that this revival has largely been driven by young adults moving back home, and by seniors moving in with their children, or moving to be close to their grandchildren. Immigrants and people of color—many of whom face greater economic and social stress—are more likely to live in extended-family households, and as America becomes more diverse, extended families are becoming more common. The past several years have also seen the rise of new living arrangements that bring nonbiological kin into family-like relationships. Groups of adults are seeking out co-living spaces, and creating forged families to replace the fractured relationships of their own nuclear families.And while the two-parent family is not about to go extinct for the financially fortunate, this new and more communal ethos is consistent with 21st-century reality and 21st-century values. As Brooks writes: “The blunt fact is that the nuclear family has been crumbling in slow motion for decades, and many of our other problems—with education, mental health, addiction, the quality of the labor force—stem from that crumbling … Americans are hungering to live in extended and forged families, in ways that are new and ancient at the same time.”Read “The Nuclear Family Was a Mistake” at The Atlantic. The March issue of the magazine appears on newsstands next week, with pieces continuing to publish across this week and next.
2020-02-10 13:00:00
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theatlantic.com
Call for Entries: Atlantic Media’s 2020 Michael Kelly Award
Atlantic Media has issued a call for entries for the 2020 Michael Kelly Award. The deadline to enter is Monday, February 17, 2020. There is no entry fee. Submission guidelines and more details about the award are at www.kellyaward.com.The Michael Kelly Award, now in its 17th year, recognizes writers and editors at U.S.-based newspapers, magazines, and online publications whose work exemplifies a quality that animated journalist Michael Kelly’s own career: the fearless pursuit and expression of truth. The award was established by Atlantic Media to honor Kelly, who died in 2003 while covering the war in Iraq. Kelly served as editor of two Atlantic Media publications, The Atlantic and National Journal.In recognition of Kelly’s career as a reporter and editor at a variety of newspapers and magazines, entries are encouraged from publications big and small, as well as from young journalists, whom Kelly took delight in mentoring.Entries must be for work published in a U.S.-based newspaper, magazine, or website in 2019 and can be submitted by email, either as a PDF for print articles or as a web link for online stories. Up to five pieces of work may be submitted.A prize of $25,000 will be awarded to the winning entry. Each entry selected as a finalist will receive $3,000.The most recent Michael Kelly Award winners are Maggie Michael, Nariman Ayman El-Mofty, and Maad al-Zikry for their reporting in The Associated Press of the ongoing civil war in Yemen. Past winners include: Shane Bauer of Mother Jones; Alissa Rubin of The New York Times, Rania Abouzeid of Politico Magazine, Rukmini Callimachi of The Associated Press, Brian Mockenhaupt of Byliner.com, Sarah Stillman of The New Yorker, David Rohde of The New York Times, C.J. Chivers of Esquire, and Loretta Tofani of The Salt Lake Tribune. Past winners have also been honored for work published by Raleigh’s The News & Observer, Reuters, The Seattle Times, and The Washington Post.Additional entry information, a full list of the past winners and finalists, and remembrances of Michael Kelly from friends and colleagues can be found at www.kellyaward.com. Questions regarding entries should be directed to Ena Alvarado-Esteller at ealvaradoesteller@theatlantic.com.Finalists will be announced in the coming months, with the first-place winner honored at a ceremony in Washington, D.C. this spring.Based in Washington, D.C., Atlantic Media’s innovative portfolio of digital, print, event, social, and video platforms includes The Atlantic, National Journal Group, and Government Executive Media Group. Atlantic Media publications and journalists are ineligible for the Michael Kelly Award.
2020-01-15 18:57:42
2021-05-12T08:53:10.000000
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theatlantic.com
The Atlantic expands publication of short stories, with launch of Fiction section
The Atlantic’s archives are teeming with the bylines of some of the greatest literary writers of the past two centuries—Virginia Woolf, Mark Twain, James Baldwin, Edith Wharton, Chinua Achebe, Joyce Carol Oates, Raymond Carver, John Updike—many of whom made their debuts in the magazine. Continuing in this tradition, The Atlantic is today launching a new Fiction section, which marks a commitment to publish original fiction regularly on the site, in addition to several times each year in the magazine. The section debuts with “Birdie,” a new story by Lauren Groff (whose first story in The Atlantic appeared in the magazine's 2006 fiction issue).In an introduction, executive editor Adrienne LaFrance explains why we need stories, particularly in this current moment: “The thinning of print magazines this century has often meant a culling of fiction. There has sometimes been a vague sense that rapid technological change would push people toward nonfiction instead; that concrete facts might be valued over imaginative exploration and existential truth.”Original fiction will complement the site’s Books section, launched in 2018, which publishes reviews, criticism, essays, and author interviews. The fiction expansion is being led by senior editor Thomas Gebremedhin.Groff’s new short story, “Birdie,” considers the lifelong secrets among four childhood friends who have reunited in a hospital, as the title character reaches the end of her life. In an accompanying interview with deputy editor Ross Andersen, Groff describes what it’s like to write about sex after #MeToo, how fiction can be used to reexamine relationships, and how she writes such vivid scenes.###Media Contact / Helen Tobin / The Atlantic / htobin@theatlantic.com
2020-01-14 18:02:00
2021-05-12T08:53:10.000000
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theatlantic.com
Nick Baumann Joining The Atlantic as Politics Editor
The Atlantic has hired Nick Baumann to be its politics editor, and Whitney Dangerfield as senior editor for Ideas. Both will begin in January and join The Atlantic as the newsroom continues to build up its reporting in the midst of President Trump’s impeachment and ahead of the 2020 presidential election.Baumann has most recently been the senior enterprise editor at HuffPost. Prior to joining HuffPost in 2015, Baumann spent eight years at Mother Jones. His writing has also appeared in The Economist, The Washington Monthly, and The Atlantic.In a note to the newsroom announcing his hire, managing editor Swati Sharma wrote: “Nick deeply gets politics, and he deeply understands magazine journalism. He is a natural fit for The Atlantic—someone who is animated by the big ideas, bold arguments, and compelling characters that make for our biggest stories… We are very glad that someone of Nick’s political savvy and intellect is joining our team at this chaotic moment in American history.” Dangerfield has worked on projects across a range of media, from written stories to photo essays to to podcasts. She spent seven years at The New York Times, where she was a senior staff editor for Opinion and Sunday Review, and launched Draft, a weekly series on the art of writing. Most recently, she was the digital editor at This American Life.Under the leadership of editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg, executive editor Adrienne LaFrance, print editor Don Peck, and Sharma, The Atlantic is continuing to expand its coverage of national politics, the Trump administration, and the historic 2020 campaign, with its Ideas and politics writers forming the bedrock of this area of coverage. Baumann will lead the politics section, which includes senior editors Nora Kelly and John Hendrickson; Dangerfield joins the growing Ideas team led by Yoni Appelbaum and Juliet Lapidos, with senior editors Becca Rosen and Dante Ramos.Last month, The Atlantic launched a new look and product experience—most striking through a new logo and visual identity; a complete redesign of the print magazine; and an iOS app that offers a more curated, visual, and personal way to read. These changes arrived two months after The Atlantic launched a digital subscription service. ###Media Contact / Helen Tobin / The Atlantic / htobin@theatlantic.com
2019-12-19 18:55:45
2021-05-12T08:53:10.000000
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theatlantic.com
“What It Means to Be a Man”—In The Atlantic’s January/February issue, Peggy Orenstein reports on the miseducation of the American boy
In “The Miseducation of the American Boy,” appearing as the cover of The Atlantic’s January/February issue, Peggy Orenstein delves into the personal lives of young men, and finds them trapped in a strange doublethink. They’ve read the headlines about toxic masculinity, sexual harassment, mass shootings, and campus rape. But in interviews with more than 100 college or college-bound boys, Orenstein found that even those who identify the excesses of masculinity can’t seem to escape them.Orenstein writes in the cover story, published today at The Atlantic, that teenage boys across races and ethnicities are still laughing at rape “jokes,” using sexual conquest to prove themselves to other guys, and learning to suppress any expression of vulnerability or sadness. The definition of masculinity seems to be contracting, Orenstein argues, and teenagers need —and want— a better answer for how to be a man today. “Feminism may have provided girls with a powerful alternative to conventional femininity, and a language with which to express the myriad problems-that-have-no-name, but there are no credible equivalents for boys,” she writes.Orenstein describes many of the teens she meets as perfectly nice, bright, and polite, but stuck in an environment where they behave in ways that, privately, they acknowledge as toxic. “Boys may know when something is wrong; they may even know that true manhood—or maybe just common decency—compels them to speak up,” she writes. “Yet, too often, they fear that if they do, they’ll be marginalized, or worse, themselves become the targets of derision from other boys. Masculinity, then, becomes not only about what boys do say, but about what they don’t—or won’t or can’t—say even when they wish they could.”Read “The Miseducation of the American Boy,” adapted from Orenstein’s forthcoming book, Boys and Sex, at The Atlantic. The January/ February issue of the magazine appears on newsstands next week, with pieces continuing to publish across this week and next.###Press Contacts:Anna Bross + Helen Tobin // The Atlanticpress@theatlantic.com
2019-12-16 12:00:00
2021-05-12T08:53:10.000000
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theatlantic.com
Bloomberg Media to Acquire CityLab From The Atlantic
The following is a joint announcement issued by Bloomberg Media about the acquisition of CityLab from The Atlantic:New York, December 10, 2019 – Bloomberg Media today announced that it has reached an agreement to acquire CityLab, The Atlantic’s award-winning news site for solutions-based journalism on urban innovation and the future of cities. The transaction is expected to close by the end of the year.“We see tremendous value in investing in premium, targeted content to build deeper connections with our business audience,” said Justin B. Smith, Chief Executive Officer of Bloomberg Media. “CityLab is a leading destination for smart reads on urban solutions, a critical topic of the new economy. We believe this acquisition will strengthen our portfolio of content verticals across our platforms, while providing more opportunities for advertisers to connect to our readers.”“We are thrilled to bring CityLab’s expert journalism to Bloomberg’s global audience,” said Bloomberg Editor in Chief John Micklethwait. “With journalists in more than 120 countries, we think we can also add some insight into how cities around the world are both succeeding and facing challenges.”Bloomberg will also acquire the CityLab event series, the preeminent global summit that gathers mayors and urban leaders to discuss and share creative, scalable solutions to the major challenges faced by cities around the world. For the past seven years the event has been co-hosted by Bloomberg Philanthropies and will continue on as part of the deal.The acquisition of CityLab will bring high-quality content on the environment, economics, culture and design to Bloomberg’s global business and finance audience. With its focus on innovative solutions for cities, the site will complement Bloomberg's forward-looking verticals, which include coverage of the future of health care (Prognosis), transportation (Hyperdrive) and retail (Checkout). More details on the integration will be announced in early 2020. In the meantime, CityLab.com will remain as a stand-alone site and retain its brand, operating under Bloomberg ownership.“CityLab has become the leading site for readers looking to live, work, learn, challenge, and improve our cities,” said Michael Finnegan, president of Atlantic Media. “Bloomberg Media deeply understands and appreciates CityLab’s mission and reporting, and is positioned to support the continuation of this important work and brand that we’re proud to have built over the last eight years. We look forward to seeing CityLab continue to prosper under the Bloomberg banner.”CityLab was founded as a stand-alone site by The Atlantic in 2011. CityLab investigates the trends and innovative solutions shaping the urban future, focusing on the biggest ideas and most pressing issues facing the world’s metro areas and neighborhoods.Bloomberg Media, the consumer-facing media organization of Bloomberg LP, is the leading global business and financial media company reaching a premium audience of more than 80 million consumers. With over 2,700 journalists and analysts across 120 countries, Bloomberg Media connects influential audiences to news, ideas and intelligence across every platform: digital, TV, radio, print and live events.About BloombergBloomberg, the global business and financial information and news leader, gives influential decision makers a critical edge by connecting them to a dynamic network of information, people and ideas. The company’s strength – delivering data, news and analytics through innovative technology, quickly and accurately – is at the core of the Bloomberg Terminal. Bloomberg’s enterprise solutions build on the company’s core strength: leveraging technology to allow customers to access, integrate, distribute and manage data and information across organizations more efficiently and effectively. For more information, visit Bloomberg.com/company or request a demo.About The AtlanticFounded in 1857 and today one of the fastest growing media platforms in the industry, The Atlantic has throughout its history championed the power of big ideas and continues to shape global debate across print, digital, events, video, and audio platforms. The Atlantic is a multimedia forum on the most critical issues of our times—from politics, global, and the economy, to technology, arts, and culture. Emerson Collective is majority owner; Atlantic Media is the minority operating owner of The Atlantic.
2019-12-10 21:26:00
2021-05-12T08:53:10.000000
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theatlantic.com
Anne Applebaum Joins The Atlantic as Staff Writer
Anne Applebaum, the Washington Post columnist and Pulitzer Prize–winning author, is joining The Atlantic as a staff writer. Applebaum will write on national politics and foreign policy, with a particular focus on Europe, for both The Atlantic’s site and the magazine. She begins with The Atlantic in January, and joins as the publication continues to expand its reporting and readership.Announcing Applebaum’s hire, Editor in Chief Jeffrey Goldberg wrote: “Anne is one of the great talents of our age; she is one of the world’s leading experts on, among other things, pre- and post-Communist Europe, disinformation and propaganda, and the future of democracy. The addition of her writing to The Atlantic will strengthen us enormously.”Applebaum wrote a 2018 feature for The Atlantic, “Europe: A Warning,” that anchored its special issue on democracy and was named a finalist for the National Magazine Award. She is currently at work on a book-length version expanding on that piece of reporting.Applebaum comes to The Atlantic after spending 17 years as a columnist at The Washington Post, and throughout those years authored four books covering European history and geopolitics, including Gulag: A History, which was awarded the 2004 Pulitzer Prize for nonfiction. Two of her books, Red Famine: Stalin’s War on Ukraine, and Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern Europe, were nominated for the National Book Award, and she is the recipient of the 2013 Cundill History Prize and the 2018 Lionel Gelber Prize.She is also Professor of Practice at the London School of Economics, where she runs ARENA, a research project on disinformation and propaganda, and is a senior fellow at the School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins. Earlier in her career at the Post, Applebaum served on its editorial board. She is a former deputy editor of Spectator magazine and a former Warsaw correspondent for The Economist.On Tuesday The Atlantic launched a new look and product experience—most striking through a new logo and visual identity; a complete redesign of the print magazine, beginning with the December issue; and an iOS app that offers a more curated, visual, and personal way to navigate The Atlantic’s journalism. These changes arrive two months after The Atlantic launched a digital subscription service, beginning a new era for The Atlantic and for its readers. Media Contact:Anna Bross | press@theatlantic.com
2019-11-15 14:13:00
2021-05-12T08:53:10.000000
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theatlantic.com
The Atlantic Makes a New Mark
The Atlantic has an arresting new look, and a new way for readers to experience its journalism.Today, The Atlantic has launched a stunning design and product experience—most striking through a new logo and visual identity; a complete redesign of the print magazine, beginning with the December issue, out today; and an iOS app that now offers a more curated, visual, and personal way to navigate The Atlantic’s journalism. This is the most dramatic overhaul of The Atlantic’s visual identity in its 162-year history; the design draws on the best from that legacy while creating an enduring and instantly recognizable mark for The Atlantic wherever readers encounter it.[See a video about the design and a Q&A between editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg and creative director Peter Mendelsund.]These changes arrive two months after The Atlantic launched a digital subscription service, beginning a new era for The Atlantic and for its readers. September and October both drew record numbers of subscribers—more than double the number of subscriptions and revenue originally forecast.“The design is bold but classical, beautiful but spare, and respectful of the reader most of all. We’ve rethought everything about the way we present The Atlantic to the world, helping readers better understand our words through clarity in design,” said Goldberg. “The resulting work makes The Atlantic visually arresting, classically informed, and radically modern, all at the same time.”Among thousands of design changes, the most noteworthy is to the logo: The Atlantic nameplate that’s consistently topped the magazine (in different forms) for a century and a half has been updated to a simple and declarative A. The Atlantic also commissioned its first bespoke typeface, Atlantic Condensed, which was inspired by the original type chosen by the magazine’s founders in 1857. The new design also marks the start of a wholesale redesign of the website, beginning with a simplified and streamlined design and user experience.The North Face is the exclusive launch sponsor of the new design and The Atlantic’s app.The MagazineThe new visual identity, led by creative director Peter Mendelsund and senior art director Oliver Munday, retains the heritage and sensibility of the 162-year-old magazine while giving as much weight to the design as has long been given to the words. Small design and editorial elements emphasize the magazine's history and ethos: the magazine’s founding year, 1857, is noted quietly on the cover; the mandate of its founders to be "of no party or clique" is prominently noted in the table of contents.By stripping away many graphics and images, the team created a clean new look that emphasizes the text, while enhancing the reading experience through original photography and illustration.The December 2019 issue inaugurates this new look, matching the power of the new design with a remarkable editorial collection. “How to Stop a Civil War” is a singular special edition devoted to explaining this particularly dispiriting moment in America, with essays confronting the question of eroding national unity by writers including Yoni Appelbaum, Andrew Ferguson, Caitlin Flanagan, Megan Garber, Tom Junod, former Secretary of State James Mattis, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Adam Serwer, and Tara Westover. “We don’t believe that the conditions in the United States today resemble those of 1850s America,” Goldberg writes in an introduction. “But we worry that the ties that bind us are fraying at alarming speed—we are becoming contemptuous of each other in ways that are both dire and possibly irreversible.”The Atlantic App: A Guide to IdeasThe Atlantic’s new iOS app is a curated, visual, and personal selection of news and ideas that adapts to a reader’s day. The “Today” tab, available without a subscription, reads like a newsletter/homepage/magazine hybrid, coming in carefully crafted editions while serving as a jumping-off point for the best of The Atlantic’s reporting and ideas of the moment. The design is bold, with whimsical visual cues throughout, such as handwritten greetings based on the current time of day for the reader (when read late at night, the app asks: “Still Awake?”).New features include: “Today,” a curated daily digest. Atlantic editors bring readers the stories that made them think. Exclusively available in the iOS app. Ad-free articles, now also available in Dark Mode. Offline reading. Save articles and download more than 150 archived magazine issues to read later. The Atlantic Crossword. Solve puzzles right in the app. An annual Atlantic subscription unlocks unlimited access to the app and TheAtlantic.com; monthly app subscriptions may also be purchased via the App Store.The app is the culmination of months of collaboration among the editorial, product, engineering, and growth teams, and will inform the next generation of The Atlantic’s digital platforms.###Media ContactAnna Brosspress@theatlantic.com
2019-11-12 12:00:00
2021-05-12T08:53:10.000000
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theatlantic.com
The Atlantic Devotes Its December Issue to a Special Report: “How to Stop a Civil War”
“We don’t believe that the conditions in the United States today resemble those of 1850s America. But we worry that the ties that bind us are fraying at alarming speed—we are becoming contemptuous of each other in ways that are both dire and possibly irreversible,” writes editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg in an introduction to The Atlantic’s December issue, “How to Stop a Civil War.” The American experiment as we know it is not guaranteed to be eternal. This observation orients every article and essay in this singular edition, with today’s best writers confronting questions of American unity and fracture, and working to explain this particular dispiriting moment. As Goldberg writes: “Our immodest hope is that this special issue, appearing on newsstands exactly 162 years after our first issue, will provide at least a partial road map for a country stuck in a cul-de-sac of its own making.”The design of The Atlantic has been remade in striking, and gorgeous, detail beginning with this issue. The Atlantic’s new visual identity is reflected at TheAtlantic.com and with a new iOS app out today that offers a unique way to experience The Atlantic’s journalism. Among thousands of design changes, the most radical is on the cover: The Atlantic flag that’s topped the magazine for a century and a half has been replaced with a simple and declarative A.Essays and arguments that make up the December cover package are divided into three discrete sections: “On the Forces That Pull Us Apart”; “Appeals to Our Better Nature”; and “Reconciliation & Its Alternatives.” Among those writing are The Atlantic’s Adam Serwer, Yoni Appelbaum, Megan Garber, Caitlin Flanagan, Andrew Ferguson, Sophie Gilbert, and David Frum, along with contributions by Tom Junod, on what Mister Rogers would do in this moment; Tara Westover, examining the urban/rural divide in the context of our national fracturing; Retired General James Mattis, on the democratic principles that citizens must embrace; Danielle Allen, on how more robust citizen participation will enhance social cohesion; and Lin-Manuel Miranda, on art’s power to reflect the world.Please find below details about these articles and others that make up our December issue. Additional stories from this package can also be found online.Yoni Applebaum’s “How America Ends” dissects the exceptional challenges America faces as a unitary construct. Applebaum notes that no rich, stable democracy has made the demographic transition we are now experiencing. As America’s historically dominant group is on its way to becoming a political minority, a sharp political backlash has already begun, exploited and exacerbated by the president. Appelbaum writes: “Numerous examples from American history—most notably the antebellum South—offer a cautionary tale about how quickly a robust democracy can weaken when a large section of the population becomes convinced that it cannot continue to win elections, and also that it cannot afford to lose them.”Megan Garber’s “No Apologies” examines why powerful people can’t quite bring themselves to say “I’m sorry” even when acknowledging wrongdoing. “In some ways it’s understandable, this widespread apology aversion,” Garber writes. “The America of the current moment is heated and hasty, and an apology can be easily weaponized.” She points to the stark contrasts between Al Franken’s resignation and Donald Trump’s election after both were accused of sexual misconduct. “I’m sorry, said sincerely, is supposed to be the first step toward forgiveness. But forgiveness is difficult to discuss when justice is so unevenly distributed—when there’s no meaningful consensus about who deserves redemption, or under what conditions.”Adam Serwer’s “Against Reconciliation” argues that the gravest danger to American democracy isn’t an excess of vitriol—it’s the false compromise of civility. Serwer likens the current state of American politics to the Reconstruction era, “when the comforts of comity were privileged over the work of building a multiracial democracy.” He argues that the illusion of peace and civility is often purchased at the expense of true progress. “The danger of our own political moment is not that Americans will again descend into a bloody conflagration. It is that the fundamental rights of marginalized people will again become bargaining chips political leaders trade for an empty reconciliation.” Andrew Ferguson’s “Can This Marriage Be Saved?” considers whether the techniques of couples counseling might help save our polarized electorate from the same feelings of mutual contempt that spell doom for a marriage. Ferguson attends a workshop put on by the grassroots citizens’ group Better Angels, and finds that teaching people to listen better to those with different political views is helpful for those who want to understand one another. However, he notes, even techniques and classes that are effective at reducing rancor are limited to a self-selecting group, since “the world—for better or worse—isn’t a workshop.”Caitlin Flanagan’s “The Things We Can’t Face” makes the case that the abortion debate will never be won by either side. Flanagan describes how Lysol was once commonly used—even prescribed by doctors—as an agent for at-home abortions, a sign of great desperation and an indicator that women will continue to get abortions whether or not they are legal. “When we made abortion legal, we decided we weren’t going to let that happen anymore,” she writes. “We were not going to let one more woman arrive at the hospital with her organs rotting inside of her.” She notes, “the argument for abortion, if made honestly, requires many words: It must evoke the recent past, the dire consequences to women of making a very simple medical procedure illegal. The argument against it doesn’t take even a single world.” Her call to humility is powerful and essential.Also publishing today: “Why It Feels Like Everything Is Going Haywire,” a look at social media’s impact on democracy from Jonathan Haidt and Tobias Rose-Stockwell; “The Road From Serfdom,” Danielle Allen’s argument for enhancing participation among the electorate; and “The Enemy Within,” a piece from former Secretary of Defense James Mattis on teaching future generations the principles of democracy.Other features from the issue—including Jeffrey Goldberg’s conversation with Tara Westover about the roots of the urban/rural divide, and Lin-Manuel Miranda’s essay on how art can bring America together—are now available at The Atlantic. Find the December issue on newsstands beginning next week.###Media ContactHelen Tobin, The Atlanticpress@theatlantic.com
2019-11-12 11:54:00
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theatlantic.com
Final Agenda for CityLab DC: Global Cities Summit in Washington, D.C. October 27-29
Next week CityLab DC, the preeminent global cities summit organized by the Aspen Institute, The Atlantic, and Bloomberg Philanthropies, will be held in Washington, D.C. from October 27-29 at the InterContinental Hotel at The Wharf. Attending are more than 45 mayors representing cities around the world, along with 300+ city innovators, business leaders, urban experts, artists, and activists. Prior summits have been held in New York, Los Angeles, London, Miami, Paris, and Detroit.Limited media credentials are available for CityLab, and must be arranged in advance. For more information, respond directly to this email or be in touch with The Atlantic’s Anna Bross and Hugo Rojo at press@theatlantic.com.A full agenda is now available at citylab2019.theatlantic.com. All plenary sessions will be streamed live and archived at the site.CityLab was founded on the principle that the most important innovation is happening at the local level and that global impact can be achieved when cities share solutions. Over the last six years, CityLab summits have crisscrossed the globe, gathering the most influential mayors and voices from over 400 cities. Each summit has made global headlines, and generated tangible takeaways for attendees.Featured 2019 interviews and sessions include: Michael R. Bloomberg, Founder of Bloomberg L.P. and Bloomberg Philanthropies; 108th Mayor of New York City, interviewed by CBS Face the Nation moderator Margaret Brennan Musician and filmmaker Dave Grohl in conversation with The Atlantic’s editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg San Juan Mayor Carmen Yulin Cruz Soto interviewed by NPR’s Mary Louise Kelly on protests as civic engagement Mayors Michelle de la Isla of Topeka, Greg Fischer of Louisville, and Sam Liccardo of San Jose interviewed by PBS NewsHour national correspondent Amna Nawaz on what local city leaders can do to combat and prevent gun violence and mass shootings Jimmie Fails, lead actor from the film The Last Black Man in San Francisco, on his award-winning film and the changing face of his city An in-depth look at the history and future of go-go music in DC featuring an interview and performance with Frank Sirius, leader of The Chuck Brown Band Mayors Jenny Durkan of Seattle, Keisha Lance Bottoms of Atlanta, and Jan Vapaavuori of Helsinki, Finland, on preparing cities for extreme climate change CityLab DC will take place at the InterContinental Hotel Washington, D.C. at The Wharf. CityLab attendees will also tour a number of sights and sites in DC including the National Monuments, National Landing, The Wharf, Plaza West, and The Digester, the first facility in North America and the largest globally to use thermal hydrolysis technology.###Media ContactsAnna Bross, Hugo RojoThe Atlanticpress@theatlantic.com Courtney GreenwaldBloomberg Philanthropiescourtney@bloomberg.orgJon PurvesThe Aspen Institutejon.purves@aspeninstitute.org
2019-10-23 23:22:23
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theatlantic.com
Nominate a Nonprofit in 5th Annual The Renewal Awards, from The Atlantic and Allstate
Nominations are open for the fifth annual Renewal Awards, a project from The Atlantic and Allstate that recognizes local organizations who are finding creative solutions to deep community challenges—and helps them make an even bigger impact. This spring, five winners will be announced and will each receive a two-year grant of $40,000 from The Atlantic and Allstate.To nominate a nonprofit, please complete this short form by December 10, 2019. Fifteen finalists will be notified of their status by the end of January.The Renewal Awards were created to celebrate social innovation demonstrated by nonprofits that are finding creative solutions to America’s most pressing problems. To date, 26 organizations have received more than $500,000 in funding to further their work.Winners have been discovered in cities dotting the country, from Hazleton, Pennsylvania, and Burlington, Vermont; to Memphis, Chicago, and Detroit; to Austin, Forest Grove, Oregon, and Los Angeles. Each year the Awards have grown in the scale and caliber of entries; the 2019 Renewal honorees were selected from 9,300 nominations, three times as many in comparison to 2018.Nominees will be evaluated by a small group of Atlantic editors and reporters, a member of the Allstate Foundation, and with an outside panel of judges, based on the following criteria:Innovative solutions: identifying new ideas for tackling difficult problems. Impact: how are nonprofits measuring and proving their ideas work? Scale: how can an idea be scaled and replicated in other communities? In addition, Allstate will select a Youth Empowerment Award winner.The Awards are a flagship initiative of The Renewal Project, which tells the stories of individuals and organizations who are solving problems in their communities. To learn more about the Awards, and read about past winners, please visit The Renewal Project.###Media ContactAnna Bross, The Atlanticanna@theatlantic.com
2019-10-17 20:48:00
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theatlantic.com
Julie Beck Named Family Editor at The Atlantic
Julie Beck has been promoted to editor of The Atlantic’s Family section, editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg and executive editor Adrienne LaFrance announced in a note to staff. Beck has been both an editor and writer at The Atlantic since 2013; most recently, she has been a senior editor for The Atlantic’s coverage of family and education since 2018.Goldberg and LaFrance wrote: “Julie is deeply creative and funny, and has both a strong magazine sensibility and an intuitive understanding of the best sorts of internet weirdness. We can’t wait to see all that she accomplishes in this new role.”Among the projects Beck has led is “The Friendship Files,” a series of interviews with sets of friends around the world exploring the intimate and indelible nature of friendships. Before joining the Family section, Beck covered science, technology, and health.The Atlantic introduced its Family section in March 2018, signaling a renewed commitment to covering the modern issues affecting families today. Reporting and features have explored topics like how Tinder changed online dating, the shifting norms of marriage and sizes of family homes, along with in-depth investigations on how domestic abusers weaponize courts against survivors, and Catholic parents at a crossroads on how to respond to the church’s ongoing sexual abuse crisis.###
2019-10-16 19:02:22
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theatlantic.com
“Jeff Bezos’s Master Plan”
In the 25 years since Jeff Bezos founded an online bookstore, the Amazon chairman and CEO has become one of the most powerful people on Earth. His company controls nearly 40 percent of all e-commerce in the United States. It owns 42 percent of the paper-book market and a third of the streaming-video market. By one estimate, Amazon Web Services commands almost half of the cloud-computing industry, with institutions as varied as General Electric and the CIA relying on its servers. A new headquarters will soon be erected near Washington, D.C., where Bezos already owns The Washington Post. As Franklin Foer writes for the cover of The Atlantic’s November issue, “Jeff Bezos has won capitalism. The question for democracy is, are we okay with that?”For the cover, “Jeff Bezos’s Master Plan,” Foer spent months speaking with current and former Amazon executives, as well as the company’s rivals and scholarly observers, to understand Bezos’s beliefs, ambitions, and motivations, as well as the implications of allowing one man to have so much power over so many corners of American life.Amazon is often included in conversations about breaking up Big Tech, but Foer writes that, unlike Facebook, Bezos’s company remains deeply trusted by the public. “In contrast to the dysfunction and cynicism that define the times, Amazon is the embodiment of competence, the rare institution that routinely works.” This is by design. When Bezos created Amazon in 1994, he set out to build “his own aristocracy of brains, a place where intelligence would rise to the top.” He molded the organization in his own image, and his attention to detail permeates the entire culture of the organization. “If you’re going in for a Bezos meeting, you’re preparing as if the world is going to end,” a former executive told Foer. “You’re like, I’ve been preparing for the last three weeks. I’ve asked every damn person that I know to think of questions that could be asked. Then Bezos will ask the one question you hadn’t considered.”As committed as Bezos might seem to achieving dominance over an ever expanding number of sectors, his ultimate goal is grander still: colonizing space. Concerns that the planet’s energy demands could outstrip its supplies—thus compromising the continuation of the human race —led Bezos to found his own space-exploration company, Blue Origin; he calls the project “his most important work.” Foer reports that through Blue Origin, Bezos is developing detailed plans for colonies that would allow the human population to grow without earthly constraints. “We can have a trillion humans in the solar system, which means we’d have a thousand Mozarts and a thousand Einsteins,” Bezos has said of the colonies. “This would be an incredible civilization.”But, Foer asks, who will govern this new world? Who will write its laws? Who will decide which earthlings are admitted into the colonies? He writes: “These questions aren’t explicitly answered, except with his fervent belief that entrepreneurs, those in his own image, will shape the future. And he will do his best to make it so. With his wealth, and the megaphone it permits him, Bezos is attempting to set the terms for the future of the species, so that his utopia can take root.”
2019-10-10 22:21:40
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theatlantic.com
“The Battle for the Constitution”—The Atlantic Launches Project in Partnership with National Constitution Center
Today, with our constitutional system again being tested as the House begins an impeachment inquiry into the president, The Atlantic and the National Constitution Center are launching a new project, “The Battle for the Constitution.” This project will cover issues from a constitutional rather than a political perspective—convening leading scholars and a diversity of voices to explore the issues and controversies surrounding the Constitution, and answer many of the fundamental questions now being asked about our system.These themes will take center stage during an event to kick off the initiative this evening at The Atlantic Festival in Washington, D.C., which will include interviews with Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA) and Rep. Lance Gooden (R-TX). The event will be live streamed. To request press credentials, please email The Atlantic’s communications team at press@theatlantic.comLongtime Atlantic editor Rebecca Rosen will be The Atlantic’s first Constitution editor. She will work in collaboration with National Constitution Center President Jeffrey Rosen (no relation) to identify writers for the project. Drawing from the publication’s founding principle of being of “no party or clique,” as Constitution editor Rebecca Rosen will guide the initiative’s nuanced coverage of the Constitution’s role in defining areas like executive power, freedom of speech, privacy, and voting rights. She was previously senior editor overseeing The Atlantic’s Education reporting and its Family section, which launched in March 2018. Before that, Rosen edited business coverage from 2014-2018.“This is obviously a hugely important subject, one that is absolutely central to The Atlantic’s meaning and purpose, and I’m very happy that an editor of Becca’s gifts, intellectual throw-weight, and deep Atlantic experience, will be taking on the role of Constitution editor,” editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg wrote in a note to staff.The initiative kicks off today with an introduction by Goldberg and an essay by Jeffrey Rosen, in which he traces the four battles for the Constitution in American history that underscore the constitutional stakes in the 2020 election and beyond. Rosen argues that we are in the middle of the fourth battle for the Constitution, which, like the previous three battles, has concerned the nature and scope of executive and congressional power.“The Battle for the Constitution” is part of the ongoing expansion of The Atlantic’s Ideas section. In the year since its launch, under editor Yoni Appelbaum’s direction, Ideas has gone toe-to-toe with the country’s top opinion pages by offering sharp perspectives, essays, and arguments that drive the national conversation. Ideas has quickly become a home for some of the top writing talent in the world—led by Atlantic staff writers, with contributions from elected officials and leaders shaping every industry—and a must-read for millions of readers.The project’s landing page features the National Constitution Center’s Interactive Constitution, an educational platform which brings together the leading legal scholars in America from diverse perspectives to write about every clause of the Constitution, exploring areas of agreement and disagreement. It will also host the National Constitution Center’s weekly podcast of constitutional debate, We the People, which convenes liberal and conservative scholars to discuss historical and constitutional issues in the news.###About The AtlanticFounded in 1857 and today one of the fastest growing media platforms in the industry, The Atlantic has throughout its history championed the power of big ideas and continues to shape global debate across print, digital, events, video, and audio platforms. With its award-winning digital presence TheAtlantic.com and CityLab.com on cities around the world, The Atlantic is a multimedia forum on the most critical issues of our times—from politics, global, and the economy, to technology, arts, and culture. Bob Cohn is president of The Atlantic and Jeffrey Goldberg is editor in chief. Emerson Collective is majority owner; Atlantic Media is the minority operating owner of The Atlantic.About the National Constitution CenterThe National Constitution Center in Philadelphia brings together people of all ages and perspectives, across America and around the world, to learn about, debate, and celebrate the greatest vision of human freedom in history, the U.S. Constitution. A private, nonprofit organization, the Center serves as America’s leading platform for constitutional education and debate, fulfilling its congressional charter “to disseminate information about the U.S. Constitution on a nonpartisan basis.” As the Museum of We the People, the Center brings the Constitution to life for visitors of all ages through interactive programs and exhibits. As America’s Town Hall, the Center brings the leading conservative and liberal thought leaders together to debate the Constitution on all media platforms. As a Headquarters for Civic Education, the Center delivers the best educational programs and online resources that inspire citizens and engage all Americans in learning about the U.S. Constitution. For more information, call 215-409-6700 or visit constitutioncenter.org.ContactAnna Bross and Hugo Rojo, The Atlanticpress@theatlantic.comAnnie Stone, National Constitution Centerastone@constitutioncenter.org
2019-09-25 18:46:12
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Zeynep Tufekci Joins The Atlantic As Contributing Writer
Zeynep Tufekci is joining The Atlantic as a contributing writer, editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg announced today. In this role, Tufekci will write regularly for The Atlantic about the intersection of technology, politics, and society.“Zeynep has an uncanny ability, through clear writing and clear thinking, to make the incomprehensible understandable, and to spot trends before most anyone else,” Goldberg said.Tufekci will appear at The Atlantic Festival tomorrow in Washington, D.C., in conversation with Goldberg. She will expand on the topics explored in her book, Twitter and Teargas: The Ecstatic, Fragile Politics of Networked Protest in the 21st Century, where she examined the possibilities and perils of modern protest movements that are increasingly rooted in online media.Tufekci has been a contributing opinion writer at The New York Times and a columnist for Wired and Scientific American. She is currently an associate professor at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill’s School of Information and Library Science and a faculty associate at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University. Throughout her research and academic work, Tufekci has studied the convergence of social change, machine intelligence, privacy, and surveillance.###
2019-09-24 01:32:57
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CityLab DC Rallies Global Mayors, Musicians, Artists, and Business Leaders October 27-29 To Explore Cities’ Influence, Footprint, and Potential
CityLab, the preeminent global cities summit organized by the Aspen Institute, The Atlantic, and Bloomberg Philanthropies, is announcing the first roster of speakers for its 7th annual summit, happening in October at The Wharf in Washington, D.C. More than 45 mayors representing cities around the world are already confirmed to attend CityLab, along with leading city innovators, business leaders, urban experts, artists, and activists. Prior summits have been held in New York, Los Angeles, London, Miami, Paris, and Detroit.This year, CityLab will explore a central question: In a time of discourse and opportunity around the world, who has the power to improve cities and unlock new solutions to urban challenges? Programming will draw from the nation’s capital as a symbol of democracy and political power, a city steeped in rich history, culture and diversity, and whose influence extends far beyond its geographic borders.CityLab DC will be held at the InterContinental Hotel Washington, D.C. at The Wharf (801 Wharf Street, SW, Washington, D.C. 20024) from October 27-29, with additional field trips and events throughout the city.Press registration is now open: To request a credential or explore coverage opportunities, please contact The Atlantic’s Anna Bross and Hugo Rojo at press@theatlantic.com. Confirmed speakers and presenters include: Michael R. Bloomberg, founder of Bloomberg LP and Bloomberg Philanthropies, and three-term mayor of New York City Rohit Aggarwala, Head of Urban Systems, Sidewalk Labs Muriel Bowser, Mayor, Washington, DC Gary Brantley, Chief Information Officer, City of Atlanta Kimberly Brown, Chief Program Officer, DC Central Kitchen Austin Choi-Fitzpatrick, Associate Professor of Social Movements and Human Rights, Joan B. Kroc School of Peace Studies, University of San Diego Ebony Edwards, Principal & CEO, Neighborbuilt/Movement KC Jimmie Fails, Lead Actor, The Last Black Man in San Francisco Kate Fillin-Yeh, Director of Strategy, National Association of City Transportation Officials Dave Grohl, Musician and Filmmaker Monty Hoffman, Founder & CEO, PN Hoffman/Developer of the Wharf Natalie Hopkinson, Professor and Author, Howard University; Go-Go Live: The Musical Life and Death of a Chocolate City Bruce Katz, Co-founder, New Localism Advisors Scott Kratz, Vice President, Building Bridges Across the River Terri Ann Lowenthal, Census Expert Eric Liu, Founder and Executive Director, Citizen University; Citizenship and American Identity Program, The Aspen Institute Carolyn Muraskin, Owner and Tour Guide, DC Design Tours Kwame Onwuachi, Chef and Author, Kith & Kin; Notes From a Young Black Chef: A Memoir Ai-jen Poo, Director, National Domestic Workers Alliance Dan Porterfield, President and CEO, The Aspen Institute Seleta Reynolds, General Manager, Los Angeles Department of Transportation; Open Mobility Foundation Shireen Santosham, Chief Innovation Officer, City of San Jose Frank Sirius, Band Leader, Chuck Brown Band Anne Stuhldreher, Director, Financial Justice, City and County of San Francisco Almis Udrys, Deputy Chief of Staff – Innovation and Policy, Office of Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer Jose Antonio Vargas, Founder, Define American Maria Vassilakou, Former Deputy Mayor of Vienna, City of Vienna Erica Walker, Founder and Principal Investigator, Noise and the City and Community Noise Lab Tommy Wells, Director, Department of Energy and Environment, Washington, DC Heather Worthington, Director, Long Range Planning, Community Planning and Economic Development, City of Minneapolis Carmen Yulin Cruz Soto, Mayor, City of San Juan, Puerto Rico Across the summit, individual sessions will explore topics like creative housing solutions; technology and surveillance in cities; micro-mobility; the role of protests as civic engagement; the shape of the urban shadow economy; and how everyone from mayors to informal leaders can work to build stronger city communities.CityLab was founded on the principle that the most important innovation is happening at the local level and that global impact can be achieved when cities share solutions. Over the last six years, CityLab summits have crisscrossed the globe, gathering the most influential mayors and voices from over 400 cities. Each summit has made global headlines, and generated tangible takeaways for attendees.###Media ContactsAnna Bross, Hugo Rojo The Atlanticpress@theatlantic.com Rebecca CarrieroBloomberg Philanthropiesrebeccac@bloomberg.orgJon PurvesThe Aspen Institutejon.purves@aspeninstitute.org
2019-09-18 17:09:17
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New Interviews Added to The Atlantic Festival: Speaker Nancy Pelosi; Laurene Powell Jobs Interviewing Bob Iger; and Kirstjen Nielsen
Updated: The Atlantic Festival, taking place Sept. 24-26, 2019, at the Harman Center for the Arts and venues across Washington, D.C.’s Penn Quarter neighborhood, has announced more than 100 speakers, including Yo-Yo Ma; former U.S. National Security Advisor Susan Rice; former Governor of California Arnold Schwarzenegger; YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki; General Jim Mattis; NBA commissioner Adam Silver; Michele Roberts, executive director of the National Basketball Players Association; CEO and executive editor of Rappler Maria Ressa; and Questlove.Newly announced today, The Festival will open on Tuesday with Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi in conversation with The Atlantic’s editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg. On Wednesday, Disney CEO Bob Iger will appear in conversation with Laurene Powell Jobs, founder and president of Emerson Collective, which is the majority owner of The Atlantic.The Atlantic Festival will also interview former Sec. Kirstjen Nielsen about, among other things, the Trump administration’s immigration policy, which she implemented as Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security.A full schedule for the various stages can be found at TheAtlanticFestival.com/agenda. All sessions will be livestreamed and archived at TheAtlantic.com.To Request a Press Credential: Contact Anna Bross or Helen Tobin (press@theatlantic.com). Press registration is quickly filling.Across three days and more than 50 events—three days of interviews on the Ideas stage; more than a dozen forums covering such topics as artificial intelligence, cybersecurity, and LGBTQ civil rights; book talks; and screenings—The Atlantic Festival will engage in conversations about some of the most critical issues defining society today.The Festival continues into the evening all three nights with an advance screening and exclusive conversation for the Discovery Channel documentary series “Why We Hate” (Tuesday), exploring the human capacity for hatred—and how we can overcome it; Yo-Yo Ma & Friends (Wednesday), an evening of music and conversation between the cellist and surprise special guests; and Pop-Up Magazine (Thursday), curated especially for the Festival, with stories of survival in the Congo, a friendship amid the 1992 LA riots, and more.###Media Contacts:Anna Bross and Helen Tobin, The Atlanticpress@theatlantic.com
2019-09-17 20:06:39
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Luise Stauss Joins The Atlantic as Director of Photography
Luise Stauss is joining The Atlantic as its first director of photography, editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg announced this week. Stauss joins the recently-expanded art team led by creative director Peter Mendelsund.“As we emphasize quality and aesthetic sophistication, our goal is to make The Atlantic an industry leader in photography. Luise is the exact right person to lead this effort,” Goldberg wrote in a note to The Atlantic’s staff.Stauss will be based out of The Atlantic’s New York office and work closely with Mendelsund, along with senior art director Oliver Munday; art directors Emily Jan and Paul Spella; and associate art directors Katie Martin and Arsh Raziuddin.Stauss helped to launch T Magazine, and later became senior photo editor at The New York Times Magazine. In 2014 she co-founded the photography consultancy Stauss&Quint and launched her own studio in 2018, creating imagery for, among others, Pentagram, Apple, and American Express and collaborating with a wide range of international magazines and publishing houses.Previously, Stauss was director of photography at Modern Farmer, art director at AR Media, has authored a design column for The New York Times Magazine, and was a faculty member at the School of Visual Arts where she taught design and photography.###
2019-09-11 16:00:00
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theatlantic.com
The Atlantic Acquires Faire Design, Integrating Into its Creative and Consulting Division Atlantic 57
The Atlantic has acquired Faire Design, a start-up strategy and design firm, and is integrating Faire’s team, work, and book of business into its creative and consulting division Atlantic 57. With this, Kate Watts, the founder of Faire Design and former U.S. president of the global agency Huge, becomes president of Atlantic 57.Atlantic 57 is a top agency for organizations looking to grow through periods of digital transformation. This acquisition, The Atlantic’s first, moves to expand Atlantic 57’s capabilities and leadership in brand services: infusing Faire Design’s obsession with experience design, product and tech with Atlantic 57’s expertise in research, editorial, and strategic planning.“Our clients are constantly looking to us for more expertise on how to transform themselves, while staying true to their purpose and their brand,” said Hayley Romer, publisher and CRO of The Atlantic. “By bringing on Kate and her team at this critical moment in our brand’s history, we’re strengthening our ability to deliver creative strategy and digital execution for our clients, making Atlantic 57 unmatched in the marketplace.”“I have always been a massive fan of The Atlantic. It is arguably one of the most progressive, yet enduring brands,” said Watts. “Atlantic 57 will continue to build upon that legacy by defining a new client services category—one that challenges existing publisher, agency, consulting and studio models. I am thrilled to join the exceptionally talented Atlantic 57 team to design that future together.”Watts will also be joined by former Huge colleague and industry veteran, Chris Stempky as managing director, along with three additional staff from Faire Design. The Atlantic 57 leadership team is filled out by: Merrill Wasser, VP of strategy, growth & marketing; Anita Sharma, managing director of research; Natasha Shields, managing director of product; and Jason Tomassini, managing director of editorial.The Atlantic was one of the first publishers to develop an agency—a natural outgrowth after transforming itself from a print magazine to a multi-platform pioneer. Six years later, the team at Atlantic 57 have become architects of modern audience engagement, from audience research and content strategy to campaign and digital execution. Atlantic 57 is the fastest-growing division of The Atlantic, averaging 25 percent revenue growth in each of the last four years, and now boasts more than 50 editors, designers, strategists, researchers, marketers, and engineers serving some of the most influential foundations, Fortune 500s, and media companies. Clients include Allstate, PBS, MIT, Chick-fil-A, public radio’s Marketplace, and the Ford Foundation.Watts is a 20-year veteran of the digital agency world. She founded Faire Design in late 2017, and quickly turned it into a full-experience agency focused on strategy and best-in-class design. Before launching Faire, Watts was U.S. president of the global agency Huge, where she oversaw their domestic offices and worked with major brands like Target, HBO, Audi, and American Express. Prior to becoming president at Huge, she established Huge’s D.C. office, growing to a staff of 60 with clients spanning non profit, government, and commercial.###Media Contact:Anna Brosspress@theatlantic.com
2019-09-10 16:48:59
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theatlantic.com
“Succession”: Inside The Atlantic’s October 2019 Cover Story
“In his short time on the political stage, Donald Trump has commandeered the national conservative movement, remade the Republican Party in his image, and used his office to confer untold value on the Trump brand,” staff writer McKay Coppins reports in a new cover story for The Atlantic. “Between their business holdings and their political influence, the Trumps could remain a fixture of American life for generations. The question now dividing his children is not just which of them will get to take up the mantle when he’s gone—but how the family will attempt to shape the country in the years ahead.”In the October issue cover story, “Succession,” published today at The Atlantic, Coppins takes readers inside the fight among the Trump children—namely Ivanka and Don Jr.—to succeed their father and rule the next generation of their family’s real-estate empire and political dynasty. Through dozens of interviews with White House officials, campaign aides, and people close to the Trumps, Coppins reports on the family’s multigenerational path to the White House, and the power struggle that’s now pitting the Trump siblings against each other—a battle marked by old grievances and petty rivalries—for control of the family dynasty.Many in the Trump orbit, Ivanka included, long assumed the first daughter to be the most likely sibling to succeed her father on the national political stage. Yet Coppins reports that her all-but-assured ascendancy is now in jeopardy, a result of Ivanka’s miscalculations on the global stage and the steady decline of her influence with her father. Trump grew exasperated with Ivanka and her husband’s tireless efforts to change his mind about the Paris climate accord, and would mock their arguments when they were not around. “They’re New York liberals,” he would say, according to a former White House aide. “Of course that’s what they think.” Ivanka’s reputation was further diminished when a clip of her awkwardly attempting to mingle with world leaders at the G20 summit went viral in June, making her “an international punchline.” The two and a half years she’s spent trying to burnish her credentials haven’t, in fact, turned her into a geopolitical player.Ivanka’s stumbles have been magnified by Don Jr.’s rising popularity on the campaign circuit. Although a White House official told Coppins that he overheard the president referring to his namesake as “not the sharpest knife in the drawer,” President Trump can’t ignore his son’s ability to draw MAGA crowds, a skill that’s led some Republicans to speculate that Don Jr. could be the next Trump elected to office. According to Republicans familiar with discussions about his political future, Don Jr. has considered running for office somewhere in the Mountain West; other allies talk him up as a potential chairman of the Republican National Committee.As he considers which of his children should carry on his legacy, Trump is caught between competing visions for the future of the family, Coppins reports—one defined by a desire for elite approval, the other by an instinct for stoking populist rage. But unlike in business, where a patriarch can install a chosen heir as CEO, politicians often see their best-laid plans upended by voters. Coppins writes: “For Trump—a distant and domineering father who has long pitted his offspring against one another—the unsettling reality is that the choice of who will succeed him may be out of his control.”Read “Succession” at The Atlantic. The October issue of the magazine appears on newsstands next week, with pieces continuing to publish across this week and next.###Press ContactsAnna Bross and Helen Tobinpress@theatlantic.com
2019-09-09 13:00:00
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theatlantic.com
The Atlantic Launches New Subscription Plans and Introduces A Metered Model
Today, The Atlantic launched a digital subscription service: offering three new subscription plans and introducing a metered model on the website. Readers may now view five articles each month before being asked to choose an annual subscription in exchange for unlimited access to The Atlantic’s journalism and other benefits. We’ve created Digital, Print + Digital, and Premium bundles; details and pricing are available here.In a letter to readers this morning, editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg wrote: “From the very first issue—cover price 25 cents—our magazine has relied on readers who recognize the value of ideas; who believe that rigorous reporting, critical thinking, independent analysis, and beautiful writing are things worth cherishing. … My dream is that the steps we take in this period—a difficult one for our industry, as you no doubt know—will guarantee that our magazine will celebrate its bicentennial as a flourishing and indispensable creator of the world’s best journalism.”Shared below is a memo to The Atlantic’s staff from Michael Finnegan, president of Atlantic Media, that speaks to the subscription strategy and to this moment.Memo to The Atlantic’s StaffFrom Michael Finnegan, President of Atlantic MediaDear Colleagues:Today marks an important moment: the relaunch of our subscriptions strategy—and, even more significantly, a new chapter in the history of The Atlantic.As of this morning, you might not necessarily notice any dramatic changes on our website, save one: When a visitor lands on an article, they’ll see a message, gracefully placed at the bottom of the screen, letting them know they can read four more articles this month. If they’d like to read more than five in total, which we hope they do, we’ll be asking them to subscribe.This change represents something far bigger than charging for unlimited access to our journalism. It’s about redoubling our focus on building deeper, more continuous, more integral relationships with our readers. We aim to do more than publish and distribute some of the best reporting and storytelling in the business. We want to become an indispensable part of our readers’ lives.We want The Atlantic to be, for example, the perfect complement to a person’s morning news brief; we want to be their mind-expanding lunch-break read, their intriguing evening wind-down, their considered weekend reflection. Which is to say, we want to become a daily habit.We believe that our product is right for the market, and for the moment we’re in. First, people have already been paying for The Atlantic, for nearly 162 years. But second, we know from extensive research that there are distinct qualities readers value in our journalism. They appreciate how we constantly strive to uphold our founding promise to be “of no party or clique”—and how our arguments often challenge their preconceived ideas about the world, and run against the grain of popular wisdom. They turn to us to sharpen their perspectives and develop their expertise. They see us as a refuge of remarkable prose.Readers tell us they love how in one moment they can be reading about America’s fraught political moment; the next, a debate about how early one should arrive at the airport; the next, an argument to upend the business of elite collegiate athletics; and so on. In other words, we’re the place where both the generalist and the specialist, the novice and the expert, can find deeper meaning and intellectual stimulation, so long as they bring a curious mind and an interest in the truth. And, crucially, we’re one of only a handful of national American journalism institutions that has stood for open debate, honest inquiry, and fact-driven reporting and analysis for more than a century and a half.Getting to today has taken a herculean effort. Our teams have been working tirelessly, over long nights and even some long weekends, on the design of our digital subscription strategy. We have added talent, doubling the product, engineering, and growth teams to ensure we have the right resources, strategies, and partners in place to be successful. And, we’ve significantly expanded our editorial team to provide deeper and wider coverage for our growing and increasingly loyal audience. As our editor in chief, Jeffrey Goldberg, wrote to readers this morning: “Today, our battalion of reporters and commentators cover the globe, providing our readers with comprehensive coverage of technological change, cultural dislocation, and political chaos; and with stories that help make sense of daily life.”Success starts with a truly exceptional product; I couldn’t be more confident in what we are delivering today, or thankful to the teams who have helped us get here. This is an all-enterprise affair. While not everyone will be working directly on building our consumer-revenue business, we all need to be invested in its success.The Atlantic has been fortunate to find audiences—and partners who want to reach those audiences—throughout our history. We now need to find many, many more readers who want to regularly engage with and ultimately pay for our journalism. That won’t be easy, but we have all of the raw ingredients and infrastructure to make it happen. Each of us, though, has to own the whole. The Atlantic will only thrive to the degree we all make sure it does.To put it more succinctly: I couldn’t be more excited to embark on this next phase with you.Michael
2019-09-05 15:05:00
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theatlantic.com
The Atlantic Hires Alisa Leonard as Head of Global Marketing
The Atlantic has hired Alisa Leonard as head of Global Marketing, it was announced today by Publisher and Chief Revenue Officer Hayley Romer. Leonard joins The Atlantic this month to lead marketing initiatives for its global partnerships team, in collaboration with its award-winning creative studio, Atlantic Re:think. For the past five years, Leonard ran her own brand strategy and transformation consulting firm, HelloQ.“Alisa is a true industry thought leader, bringing tremendous energy, passion, and creativity to her work,” Romer said. “Her talent, combined with the way she embodies The Atlantic’s core values, make her the right choice to lead marketing at this critical moment in our brand’s history.”In this role, Leonard will work in close coordination with Jeremy Elias, executive creative director of Atlantic Re:think, and Johanna Mayer-Jones, senior vice president of global partnerships, to deliver best-in-class solutions for clients. “At a time when so much is shifting in the marketing landscape, I couldn’t be more excited to be joining The Atlantic,” Leonard said. “The Atlantic is such a powerful brand and voice; I’m thrilled to be part of the team bringing forward that same level of excellence to our marketing partnerships.”Leonard launched HelloQ in 2014 to work with leading companies—including Coca-Cola, Microsoft, and the UN Refugee Agency—on generational trends, innovative brand experience and design, and product development. Prior to running her own company, Leonard was president of Levo League, a platform for professional Millennial women, where she worked with major brands to deliver custom insights, integrated marketing solutions, and innovative employee-engagement programs. She has also held senior strategy roles at several agencies, including the Chicago-based socialdeviant and iCrossing, where she led the development of the first-to-market Live Media Studio for branded content and social engagement. The Atlantic’s sales and marketing ingenuity has delivered years of revenue and profit growth. Atlantic Re:think, named “Best Content Studio” four times in the past two years, leads the native-content space by emphasizing high-impact, art-directed campaigns for top global brands; native drove three-quarters of The Atlantic’s digital ad revenue in 2018.
2019-08-19 20:48:09
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theatlantic.com
The Atlantic Hires Kaitlyn Tiffany as Staff Writer
Today, The Atlantic announced that Kaitlyn Tiffany is joining its tech team as a staff writer covering internet culture. Tiffany comes to The Atlantic from The Goods, at Vox, where she was a tech reporter. She begins with The Atlantic next month, and will be based in New York.In a note to staff announcing Tiffany’s hire, editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg and executive editor Adrienne LaFrance wrote: “Kaitlyn is funny, sharp, and possesses both a wealth of weird internet knowledge and a classic magazine sensibility. We can’t wait to have her writing for The Atlantic.”Tiffany previously wrote about consumer culture for The Goods at Vox, covering everything from face tattoos to palm fronds. Before joining Vox, Tiffany worked in audience development at Damn Joan and was a culture reporter at The Verge.Tiffany will be part of The Atlantic’s technology desk, led by senior editor Ellen Cushing. Cushing recently took on a larger role leading technology coverage and experimental features. In 2018, The Atlantic established a bureau in San Francisco as a base for a growing reporting team and coverage dedicated to technology.
2019-08-19 16:33:00
2021-05-12T08:53:10.000000
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theatlantic.com
Ian Urbina Joins The Atlantic as Contributing Writer
Editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg announced today that Ian Urbina, a longtime reporter for The New York Times and a winner of the Pulitzer Prize, is becoming a contributing writer for The Atlantic.Urbina’s first piece for The Atlantic, “A Visit to the World’s Tiniest Nation,” published this morning, is an exploration of what the remarkable (and bizarre) story of Sealand—a “micro-nation” on an eerie metal platform off the coast of England—tells us about libertarianism, national sovereignty, and the lawlessness of the ocean. As part of his five years of extensive reporting on the high seas for his forthcoming book The Outlaw Ocean, from which the piece is adapted, Urbina traveled through the churning waves of the North Sea to tour Sealand and interview its founding family. For The Atlantic, Urbina will continue his reporting on issues associated with the world’s oceans—crime, piracy, global migration, climate change—and on other topics, publishing across multiple platforms.“Ian is one of the most intrepid reporters working today,” Goldberg says. “His writing about the world’s oceans is totally pathbreaking. I’m so excited to share his writing with readers of The Atlantic.”During his career, Urbina has won a Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News, a George Polk Award for Foreign Reporting, and his work has been nominated for an Emmy Award. He has degrees in history and cultural anthropology from Georgetown University and the University of Chicago. Before joining The New York Times, he was a Fulbright Fellow in Cuba and he also wrote about the Middle East and Africa for various outlets including the Los Angeles Times, Harper’s, and Vanity Fair.The Atlantic recently added contributing writers Rachel Monroe, whose latest investigation for The Atlantic told the story of the con man-turned-true-crime author; and Drew Gilpin Faust, President Emerita and the Arthur Kingsley Porter University Professor at Harvard University, who wrote recently on race, history, and memories of her childhood in Virginia.
2019-08-15 18:53:00
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theatlantic.com